Top React Performance Optimization Tips in 2024

Quick Summary:

React is self-sufficient to an extent when it comes to minimizing the frequency of costly DOM operations for updating the UI. However, businesses looking to improve React performance to the next level can benefit from the industry-grade React performance optimization techniques and best practices we will discuss today.

React almost guarantees faster UI than most competitors due to its internal performance-driven development approach. However, when your React app begins to scale, you might notice a few performance issues or lags. React’s internal optimization tricks might not suffice to sustain the increasing traffic and complexity of your rapidly growing or enterprise-grade React app. This is where the question arises ‘how to improve performance in React JS?‘. So, if you’re looking for ways to enhance React app performance or speed up React, we have you covered!

Metrics To Keep in Mind to Measure React Performance

Tracking key performance metrics is vital for monitoring web application health. Metrics like time to first byte, first contentful paint and cumulative layout shift provide insights into load times, visual stability, and user experience. Analyzing these vitals helps identify bottlenecks to address.

Metrics To Keep in Mind to Measure React Performance

Page Load Time

The duration required for the page to fully load and show all its content is indicated by this parameter. Better user experiences are typically the result of faster load times. The recent stats from Forbes, suggest that:

Here are shorter versions of those statistics:

  • 47% abandon sites taking over 2 seconds to load.
  • 40% leave if a site takes more than 3 seconds to load.
  • 88% won’t revisit a site after a bad experience.

Responsiveness

This is the rate at which a website reacts to user events, such as scrolling or clicking a button. A responsive website has a rapid, crisp feel to it, which can also enhance user experience.

Resource Usage

This is the quantity of server resources (such as CPU and memory) that a website utilizes to serve pages and process requests. The server can manage more traffic and spend less money thanks to an optimized website’s effective resource use.

Scalability

This is the capacity of a website to withstand a rise in traffic and load without jeopardizing performance. Without stuttering or going offline, a scalable website can withstand unexpected traffic increases.

Using Performance Tab

When you’re looking into the react performance benchmark in your react application. By default, react includes helpful warnings which turn out to be very helpful during development. However, these warnings make react slower and larger. Make sure to use the production version when you deploy the app.

If you aren’t sure whether your build process is set up correctly, you can check it by correctly, you can check it by installing React Developer’s Tool for Chrome. You can use it to check whether the website is working on React you can see the icon which has a dark background.

Reactjs

React Performance Tools Chrome

You can utilize the Chrome browser’s “Performance” tab to observe how React components mount, update, & unmount while you’re still in development mode, according to React’s instructions. An illustration of Chrome’s “Performance” tab profiling and examining my blog while it is in development mode may be seen in the image below:

React Performance Tools


To do this follow these steps:

  • Because they can tamper with the analysis result, disable all extensions for a while, especially React Developer Tools. By operating your browser in private mode, you may quickly disable addons
  • A development mode of the program must be running. Consequently, the program must be operating locally
  • After that, launch the developer tools for Chrome. Press Ctrl + Shift + E to begin recording after selecting the “performance” option
  • Use the profile to carry out your desired actions. Less than 20 seconds should be recorded to avoid Chrome hanging
  • Stop recording
  • The “User Timing” label will be used to group react events

The profiler’s statistics are based on comparisons. In production, rendering speeds for components are often faster. However, this should enable you to determine the depth and frequency of UI updates, as well as when they are made inadvertently.

React Performance Profiling

The documentation for React states that in react-dom 16.5 and react-native 0.57 and later, React Developer Tools Profiler offers increased profiling capabilities in developer mode. The profiler gathers timing data about each displayed component using React’s experimental Profiler API to pinpoint performance problems in a React application. The profiler tool that comes with React Developer Tools may be used when you download it for your browser. Only React v16.5production-profiling +’s build and development modes allow for the use of the profiler

The steps to accomplish this is as follows:

  • Download the React Developers Tools
  • Ensure that React v16.5+ is installed and running in production-profiling mode or development mode, depending on the case
  • Navigate to the “Developer Tools” tab in Chrome. React Developer Tools will offer a brand-new tab called “Profiler,” which will be accessible
  • Perform the acts you want to profile before clicking the “Record” button
  • Stop recording as soon as you have finished the acts you wish to profile
  • Your React app’s event handlers and elements will all be displayed on a graph (called a flame graph)

For more details, you can refer to the official blog.

Now, that you are clear about the factors that you need to measure to optimize react performance. Let’s move on to the react performance tips, that you can utilize to improve react performance.

React Performance Optimization Techniques

Let’s delve into the essential React Performance Optimization Techniques and Strategies aimed at enhancing the performance of your React apps. From identifying performance bottlenecks to implementing advanced optimization strategies, we explore the key steps that will not only elevate your performance optimization React game but also pave the way for top-notch React app performance optimization.  Performance in react can be understood in two ways 1) Loading Performance 2) Runtime Performance. For better understanding of react performance optimization techniques we have divided the list in 2 parts namely Loading performance & Runtime performance.

But before that let’s understand what Loading & Runtime performance means.

React Performance Optimization Techniques

Loading performance: Compress & Loads assests/code (Mostly Non-React Things)

Runtime Performance: CPU & rendering issues (mostly React-specific things

Let’s begin with the curated list of React Performance Optimization

Runtime Performance List

Following are the react performance optimization best practices under the runtime performance list.

React Performance Optimization Best Practices for Runtime Performance List

✬ List Virtualization in React App

This react performance tuning technique is used when you want to render a large list of data or a table with enormous data, it can significantly slow down your app’s performance. Virtualization can help in such scenarios like this with the help of libraries like react-windows. It helps solve this problem by rendering only currently visible items in the list. Which in turn allows the rendering of lists of any size.


import { FixedSizeList } from "react-window";

function VirtualizedList() {
  const listRef = useRef();

  const rowRenderer = ({ index, style }) => (
    <div style={style}>{/* Render item #index */}</div>
  );

  return (
    <FixedSizeList
      ref={listRef}
      height={500}
      width={300}
      itemCount={1000}
      itemSize={50}
    >
      {rowRenderer}
    </FixedSizeList>
  );
}

✬ Throttling & Debouncing

The number of times an event handler is invoked in a particular time limit is known as the trigger rate. Mouse clicks, on average, have lower event trigger rates than scrolling and mouseover. Higher event trigger rates can cause your program to crash, but there are workarounds. Determine which event handler is performing the costly work. An XHR request or DOM manipulation that produces UI modifications, for example, processes a lot of data, or a calculation event task. Throttling and debouncing strategies can help in these situations without requiring any changes to the event listener.

Throttling

In an essence, throttle involves postponing the execution of a function. When an event is triggered, instead of instantly executing the event handler/function, you’ll add a few milliseconds of delay. When implementing limitless scrolling, this can be used. You can, for example, defer the XHR call rather than fetching the next result set as the user scrolls. Throttling can be done in a variety of ways. You can set a limit based on the number of events that are triggered or the delay event handler that is being used.

Debouncing

Debouncing is a strategy for preventing the event trigger from firing too frequently. If you’re using Lodash, you can use the debounce function to wrap the function you want.

Let’s use an example to better grasp this.

import debouce from 'lodash.debounce';

class SearchComments extends React.Component {
 constructor(props) {
   super(props);
   this.state = { searchQuery: “” };
 }

 setSearchQuery = debounce(e => {
   this.setState({ searchQuery: e.target.value });

   // Fire API call or Comments manipulation on client end side
 }, 1000);

 render() {
   return (
     <div>
       <h1>Search Comments</h1>
       <input type="text" onChange={this.setSearchQuery} />
     </div>
   );
 }
}

If you’re not using loadash, you can use the minified debounced function to implement in javascript.

Function debounce(a,b,c){var d,e;return function(){function h(){d=null,c||(e=a.apply(f,g))}var f=this,g=arguments;return clearTimeout(d),d=setTimeout(h,b),c&&!d&&(e=a.apply(f,g)),e}}

✬ Use React Fragment

With React, there are cases where you will need to render multiple elements or return a group of related items. Let’s look at the example.

function App() {
  return (
      <h1>Hello React!</h1>
      <h1>Hello React Again!</h1>
  );
}

The above code will give you an error stating ” Adjacent JSX elements must be wrapped in an enclosing tag”.  This means that you need to wrap both elements within the parent div.

function App() {
  return (
    <div>
      <h1>Hello React!</h1>
      <h1>Hello React Again!</h1>
    </div>
  );
}

This will solve the error but it comes with the risk. Here an extra node is added to the DOM. In a case, like this where a child component is enclosed within the parent component, it creates an issue. The better way of solving this issue is to use React Fragment which will not add additional nodes to the DOM

function Columns()
 {
  return (
    <React.Fragment>
      <td>Hello React!</td>
      <td>Hello React Again!</td>
    </React.Fragment>
  );
}

You can also use short syntax <></> for declaring fragment.

function Columns()
{
  return (
    <>
      <td>Hello React!</td>
      <td>Hello React Again!</td>
    </>
  );
}

✬ Multiple Chunk Files

Your application will always start with a few elements. You can quickly add new features and dependencies to your system. It’ll result in a massive production file. Consider utilizing CommonsChunkplugin for webpack to segregate your vendor or third-party library code from your application code, resulting in two different files. Vendor.bundle.js and app.bundle.js are the two files you’ll end up with. The browser caches these files less frequently and retrieves resources in parallel, reducing load time.

✬ Use React. Memo

React. memo is a great way of React js Performance Optimization as it helps cache functional components.

Memoization is a technique for speeding up computer programs by caching the results of expensive function calls and returning the cached result when the identical inputs are encountered again.

So how does it work? When a function is rendered using this technique it will save the result in memory, and the next time the function with the same argument is called it provides the saved result saving bandwidth.

In React, functions are functional components, and arguments are props. Let’s understand it better with an example. So, how does it function? When a function is rendered using this technique, the result is preserved in memory, and the saved result is returned the next time the function with the same parameter is invoked, conserving bandwidth.

Arguments are props in React, while functions are functional components. Let’s look at an example to help us grasp it better.

import React from 'react';
const MyComponent = React.memo(props => {/* render only if the props changed */});

React. Memo is a higher-order component and it’s like React. Pure Component but for using function components instead of classes

✬ Use React. Suspense

React’s Suspense component allows you to lazy load components to improve performance. Components are loaded dynamically when they are rendered rather than upfront. For example:


AsyncBlogPost.js
const AsyncBlogPost = React.lazy(() => import('./BlogPost')); 
App.js
<Suspense fallback={<Spinner/>}>
 <AsyncBlogPost postId={1}/> 
</Suspense>

The Suspense component will display the fallback Spinner component until the AsyncBlogPost is loaded. This prevents having to load all components up front.

✬ Use Call back

Callbacks are an effective strategy for deferring expensive computations in React components until they are required. This prevents wasted work in scenarios where the component may not even render. A common pattern is to wrap the expensive operation in a function that accepts a callback. The computation is then run asynchronously, and the callback is invoked when it completes:


  // PostStats.js
  
 const PostStats = ({post}) => {
  
   const [stats, setStats] = useState({});
  
   useEffect(() => {
     getPostStats(post.id, stats => {
       setStats(stats);
     });
   }, [post.id]);
  
   // render stats  
 }
  
 // Utils.js
 const getPostStats = (id, callback) => {
  
   // Simulate async operation
   setTimeout(() => {
     const stats = {
       views: 1000,
       likes: 200   
     };
     
     callback(stats);
   }, 1000);
   
 }

With this approach, getPostStats will not execute until PostStats mounts and calls the function. The callback allows passing the result back to the component asynchronously. This pattern applies for any costly computations like API calls or intense calculations. Deferring work until needed often optimizes performance.

✬ Avoid Inline Function Definition

The inline function will always fail the prop diff when React conducts a diff check since functions are objects in JavaScript ( {} ! = {} ). Also, if an array function is used in a JSX property, it will produce a new instance of the function on each render. The garbage collector may have a lot of work on his hands as a result of this.


default class CommentList extends React.Component {
    state = {
        comments: [],
        selectedCommentId: null
    }

    render(){
        const { comments } = this.state;
        return (
           comments.map((comment)=>{
               return <Comment onClick={(e)=>{
                    this.setState({selectedCommentId:comment.commentId})
               }} comment={comment} key={comment.id}/>
           }) 
        )
    }
}

Instead of defining the inline function for props, you can define the arrow function


default class CommentList extends React.Component {
    state = {
        comments: [],
        selectedCommentId: null
    }

    onCommentClick = (commentId)=>{
        this.setState({selectedCommentId:commentId})
    }

    render(){
        const { comments } = this.state;
        return (
           comments.map((comment)=>{
               return <Comment onClick={this.onCommentClick} 
                comment={comment} key={comment.id}/>
           }) 
        )
    }
}

✬ Use set state

The setState method accepts a callback function that is invoked after the component re-renders. This can be used to delay additional state updates until after the initial render to improve performance.


handleClick = () => {
    this.setState({count: this.state.count + 1}, () => { 
     // Do additional state update here
     this.setState({otherState: 'value'});
   });
 }
 render() {
   //...
 }

In this example, when handleClick is called setState will increment count but wait to update otherState until after the re-render occurs. Batching multiple state updates into a single render cycle improves performance by minimizing re-renders. The callback from setState allows queueing additional state changes after the initial update.

✬ Handle CPU Extensive Tasks

When dealing with complex calculations or CPU heavy operations, avoid performing the work directly in render. This can block the main thread and cause jank. Instead, offload the work to web workers or break it into chunks using setTimeout or requestIdleCallback:

// ExpensiveCalc.js
const ExpensiveCalc = ({ data }) => {
	const [result, setResult] = useState(null);
	useEffect(() => {
		const chunks = [];
		// Break into chunks
		for (let i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
			chunks.push(doChunkOfWork(data));
		}
		// Process separately
		for (let chunk of chunks) {
			setTimeout(() => {
				// Compute chunk
			});
		}
		// Final result
		setResult(finalValue);
	}, [data]);
	return <ResultDisplay result={result} />;
};

✬ Server-side Rendering

React Server-side rendering generates the initial HTML markup on the server before sending it to the client. This allows the page to load faster, showing content immediately without waiting for JS.


// server.js
import ReactDOMServer from "react-dom/server";
import App from "./App";
app.get("/", (req, res) => {
	const app = ReactDOMServer.renderToString(<App />);
	res.send(`
     <html>
       <head></head>
       <body>
         <div id="root">${app}</div>
       </body>
     </html>
   `);
});
// client.js
ReactDOM.hydrate(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));

✬ Avoid Async Initialization in componentWillMount()

Only one time, immediately before the initial render, is componentWillMount() invoked. Because this function is run before render, our component will not have access to the references or DOM element ().

Here’s a terrible example:


function componentDidMount() {
  axios.get(`api/comments`)
    .then((result) => {
      const comments = result.data
      this.setState({
        comments: comments
      })
    })
}

Make component initialization async in the componentDid Mount lifecycle hook to improve it:


function componentDidMount() {
  axios.get(`api/comments`)
     .then((result) => {
      const comments = result.data
       this.setState({
         comments: comments
       })
     })
 }

The element is Because props and state are defined during this lifecycle method, WillMount() is useful for handling component setups and doing synchronous calculations based on props.

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Loading Performance List

Here are the best practices for optimizing React performance within the loading performance list.

React Performance Optimization Best Practices for Loading Performance List

✬ Use Production Build

While doing react performance testing make sure you’re testing with the minified production build if you’re benchmarking or having react performance issues. React comes with a lot of useful warnings by default. These alerts are really useful in the development process. They do, however, make React bigger and slower, so make sure you use the production version when deploying the project. If you’re not sure if your build process is set up correctly, you can use React Developer Tools for Chrome to check. The icon will have a dark background if you visit a site that uses React in production mode:

react.js web app
The icon will have a red backdrop if you visit a site that is using React in development mode:

React.js

When working on your app, you should use the development mode, and when releasing it to users, you should use the production model. It’s also worth noting that if you’re utilizing React via a CDN, you should update React from development files to production-ready versions.

<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script
src="https://unpkg.com/[email protected]/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

✬ Enable GZIP Compression

The web server can give a reduced file size by using Gzip compression, which means your website will load faster. Because JavaScript, CSS, and HTML files include a lot of repeating text with a lot of whitespaces, gzip works exceptionally well. Because gzip compresses common strings, it can reduce the size of pages and stylesheets by up to 70%, resulting in faster initial rendering.

If you are using Node/Express as the backend, you can use Gzipping to compress your bundle size with the compression module.


const express = require('express');

const compression = require('compression');

const app = express();

// Pass `compression` as a middleware!

app.use(compression());

✬ Use CDN

­A CDN is a terrific way to provide static information swiftly and efficiently from your website or mobile application to your audience. The “edge server” is the closest user request server, depending on the geolocation. The user is connected to the edge server when they request material from your website, which is supplied through a CDN, and they are guaranteed the best online experience.

These are some of the most effective CDN providers on the market. CloudFront, CloudFare, Akamai, MAXCDN, Google Cloud CDN, and others are examples. You can also host your static content on CDN using Nelilfy or Sugre.sh. Surge is a free CLI tool that automatically deploys your static project to a high-performance CDN.

✬ Use React.Lazy

Lazy loading is a great technique for react performance improvements. The basic idea of lazy loading is to load the component when it’s needed. React comes bundled with React. lazy API so that you can render a dynamic import as a regular component.  Here instead of loading your regular component like :

import LazyComponent from './LazyComponent';

You can cut down the risk by using the lazy method to render the component

const LazyComponent = React.lazy(() => import('./LazyComponent'));

React. lazy takes a function that must call a dynamic import(). This will return a promise which resolves to a module with default export containing a react component

The lazy component should be rendered inside a suspense component, which allows you to add fallback content as a loading state while waiting for the lazy component to load.

import React, { Suspense } from "react";
const LazyComponent = React.lazy(() => import("./LazyComponent"));
function MyComponent() {
  return (
    <div>
      {" "}
      <Suspense fallback={<div>Loading....</div>}>
        {" "}
        <LazyComponent />{" "}
      </Suspense>{" "}
    </div>
  );
}

✬ Dependency Optimization

It’s good analyzing how much code you’re using from dependencies while trying to Optimize react app bundle size. You may, for example, be using Moment.js, which offers multi-language localized files. If you don’t need to support several languages, you can remove unnecessary locales from the final bundle with the moment-locales-webpack-plugin.

Let’s take the case of loadash, where you’re only using 20 of the 100+ methods available. Having all those other approaches isn’t ideal in that case. You may do this by removing unneeded functions with the loadash-webpack-plugin.

From here, you can download the list of dependencies you can optimize

✬ Use CSS animation instead of JS Animation

Animations are inevitable for fluid and pleasurable user experiences. There are many ways to implement web animations. Generally, animations are created in three ways:

  • CSS Transitions
  • CSS animations
  • Javascript

Which one is chosen depends on the type of animation we want to add.

When to use CSS -based animation
  • To add “one-shot” transitions like toggling UI elements state
  • For smaller, self-contained states of UI elements
When to use JavaScript-Based animation
  • When you want to have advanced effects
  • You need significant control over the animation
  • Need to trigger animation, like mouseover, etc
  • When using requestAnimationFrame for visual changes

✬ Trim JavaScript Bundles

To reduce any code redundancy, audit and trim JavaScript packages. When you’re duplicating things unnecessarily or accidentally, the possibilities are increased. Ensure that they are analyzed and that the amount of your bundled code is determined. To understand it better lets take help of an example.

Here is an example of optimizing a React JavaScript bundle size:

// utils.js
export function log(message) {
	console.log(message);
}
export function capitalize(string) {
	return string.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + string.slice(1);
}
// analytics.js
import { log } from "./utils";
export function trackEvent(eventName) {
	log("Tracking event: " + eventName);
}
// App.js
import React from "react";
import { capitalize } from "./utils";
import { trackEvent } from "./analytics";
function App() {
	function handleClick() {
		const text = capitalize("hello world");
		trackEvent("button click");
		console.log(text);
	}
	return >button onClick={handleClick}>Click Me>/button>;
}
export default App;

This generates a large bundle:

bundle.js (205 KB)

After optimizing:

// utils.js
export const capitalize = (string) => {
	return string.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + string.slice(1);
};
// analytics.js
export const trackEvent = (eventName) => {
	console.log("Tracking event: " + eventName);
};
// App.js
import React from "react";
import { capitalize } from "./utils";
import { trackEvent } from "./analytics";
function App() {
	function handleClick() {
		const text = capitalize("hello world");
		trackEvent("button click");
		console.log(text);
	}
	return ;
}
export default App;

The optimized bundle is much smaller: bundle.js (29 KB) This demonstrates removing unused exports, minifying code, and tree shaking in React to reduce bundle size.

✬ Lazy loading images in react

The react-lazyload library allows deferring image loading until they are visible in the viewport. First install:
npm install react-lazyload

Then import and use the LazyLoad component:

import LazyLoad from 'react-lazyload';
   const MyComponent = () => (
   <LazyLoad height={200} offset={100}>
     <img src="https://aglowiditsolutions.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/10/web-developers-cta.png" /> 
   </LazyLoad>  
);

Things to consider before Optimizing your React Performance

Before diving right into how to optimize your React performance, you should first take a step back and understand what is causing your React app performance to lag so much. Moreover, optimizing React app shouldn’t be only limited to times when your app starts malfunctioning; it should be a continuous effort to improve your React app performance. Here are certain things to pay attention to before you start optimizing your React app:

Things to consider before Optimizing your React Performance

What are your current React Performance Bottlenecks?

First step towards any successful performance improvement is to identify the bottlenecks and challenges of React app performance. Luckily, many React developer performance monitoring tools like Profiler allow developers to gauge their React apps’ performance. Profiler will enable developers to record the time a component takes to render. It also helps understand why a component renders and how other components interact. Such insights will help you get a clearer picture of your React app’s current state, which will help you devise a performance optimization method later.

Which React Component do I need to Optimize first?

First step towards any successful performance improvement is to identify the bottlenecks and challenges of React app performance. Luckily, many React developer performance monitoring tools like Profiler allow developers to gauge their React apps’ performance. Profiler will enable developers to record the time a component takes to render. It also helps understand why a component renders and how other components interact. Such insights will help you get a clearer picture of your React app’s current state, which will help you devise a performance optimization method later.

When should React update the Component?

React’s default behaviour is to run and render the virtual DOM, compare the current DOM with the previous DOM, check for any differences in every component in their props or state, and then re-render the DOM to make those changes. This is not an issue when your React app is small or lacks many components. However, when your app grows in size, re-rendering your React app after comparing it with the entire Virtual DOM for each action will dramatically slow down its performance.

To workaround, this issue, React provides a way for developers to set which component needs re-rendering. It is known as the shouldComponentUpdate method.

function shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) {
  return true;
}

If the value for this method returns true, it triggers the render-diff process. Now you can control the render-diff method and set which components you don’t want to re-render. You only need to return a false value from the above function to do so. You can compare the current and next state and props to check if they need re-rendering or not.

function shouldComponentUpdate(nextProps, nextState) {
  return nextProps.id !== this.props.id;
}

What are the common react performance issues?

Until you launch your React application on additional environments, performance issues can be hidden. You can find optimization techniques in the following sections if you think any of the following are affecting your React app. The following three performance problems are typical:

What are the common react performance issues

Re-rendering

A component in your app is re-rendering code when modified at run-time without modifying the original code. Re-rendering can cause performance issues across all different components.

Clumped Component tree

When components are grouped, the overall app performance can decline. The best practice is to place commonly updated regions into their own, isolated components.

Not utilizing pure components

A pure component only re-renders if the props are different when react compares the previous prop state to the current state.

Now that we have seen some of the react performance tips. Let’s take a look at some of the tools to improve react performance.

Tools for Improving React Performance

After getting better insights into your existing React app, you should understand how to utilize some of the best React performance optimization tools that allow developers to monitor their app performance, improve certain aspects of their project and do much more. Here are the top React tools for improving React performance:

Tools for Improving React Performance

1. React Profiler

Profiler is one of the best React performance tools that help developers measure the number of times their components re-render and what resources they utilize for the rendering process. With profiler, you also get a fair estimate of the time it takes for the rendering process. It is an ideal tool for inspecting or detecting performance bottlenecks in the React app.

2. Bit. dev

Bit is another useful React performance tool for organizing and reusing components. It also makes sharing these reusable components with your teams much easier. The ability to store all performance-optimized React components in an easily accessible yet secure place allows maximum code reusability, speeding up React app performance significantly. Moreover, Bit.dev will enable developers to pick and choose components of a component library without dealing with the entire component library.

3. Why-did-you-render

Another yet popular React performance optimization tool is why-did-you-render by Welldone Software. Its purpose is to notify the developer about any unnecessary or avoidable re-renders in their React or React Native code. Moreover, it can also be used to understand any component’s behavior and why it re-renders.

4. React Developer Tools

React Developer Tools is React’s official extension that helps significantly in monitoring React performance. One of its most useful features is ‘Highlight Updates,’ also used for tracking re-rendering in your React app. It simply colors the boundaries of any component that gets re-rendered, making it easier for developers to spot any re-rendering activities when improving React performance.

React Performance Best Practices

Let’s look at some of the best practices to keep in mind for react app performance optimization.

React Performance Best Practices

Component Interaction

Using excellent tools like React dev tools, you can solve more than 50% of react performance issues in React by examining how your components interacted in your project. However, before figuring out how the components behave, make sure you understand how React works underneath the hood.

RESELECT & Immutable.js

If you’re having trouble with performance in Redux-based React projects, try RESELECT and Immutable.js. Reselect is a basic Redux selector library that may be used to create memorized selectors. Selectors can be defined as functions that retrieve chunks of the Redux state for React components.

Use Production Mode Flag

Switching to production mode is vital for web app optimization. It disables developer-specific checks and warnings that, while crucial during development, can bog down rendering speed. This simple step significantly enhances overall performance, ensuring a seamless user experience in the live environment.

Understanding THIS Bending

Ensure proper method binding in components to prevent unnecessary re-renders. By binding to arrow functions or employing class fields, you sidestep repetitive ‘this’ rebinding during each render cycle. This optimization streamlines performance, resulting in a more responsive web application.

Avoid using Index as Key

When looping over arrays to make components, avoid using the index as the key prop. This causes unnecessary re-renders when the array order changes. Use a unique ID instead.

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Wrapping Up!

There are various react optimization techniques to improve react performance, such as lazy loading components, avoiding unnecessary renders, and much more. To make the most of the react app, you need to leverage its tools and techniques. A react web app performance lies in the simplicity of its components, and overwhelming the render-diff algorithm can make your app perform poorly and frustratingly. The techniques outlined above are all great ways for you to practice react js performance optimization for your application.

FAQs

Optimize React performance through production builds, avoiding unnecessary re-renders, and virtualizing long lists with libraries like react-window.

Key React features for optimization include React.memo for avoiding re-renders, React.PureComponent for shallow prop checking, and immutable data structures to optimize re-rendering.

Optimize React API calls by memoizing requests, limiting frequency of calls, leveraging web workers for parallel requests, and updating data on interval versus on every user event.

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    Saurabh Barot

    Saurabh Barot, the CTO of Aglowid IT Solutions, leads a team of 50+ IT experts across various domains. He excels in web, mobile, IoT, AI/ML, and emerging tech. Saurabh's technical prowess is underscored by his contributions to Agile, Scrum, and Sprint-based milestones. His guidance as a CTO ensures remote teams achieve project success with precision and technical excellence.

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